Left: Torrington Democratic Mayoral Candidate Stephen Ivain, who announced his candiacy on Monday, July 12. He will be running against current Torrington Mayor, Republican Elinor Carbone, who is seeking a third term in office. Photos: Shaw Israel Izikson
Left: Torrington Democratic Mayoral Candidate Stephen Ivain, who announced his candidacy on Monday, July 12. He will be running against current Torrington Mayor, Republican Elinor Carbone, who is seeking a third term in office. Photos: Shaw Israel Izikson
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TORRINGTON — This year’s mayor race has started, with current Mayor Elinor Carbone (R) announcing that she will be seeking a third term, while businessman Stephen Ivain (D) announcing that he will run against Carbone.
At a press conference at City Hall on Friday, July 9, Carbone announced that she would run once again for mayor.
Carbone, a lifelong Torrington resident, was first elected mayor in 2013.
Previously, she served on the City Council and the Board of Education. She was also a member of the Torrington Development Corporation from 2006 to 2012, the Charter Revision Commission from 2011-2012, the Blue Ribbon Commission from 2009 to 2012, and as a liaison to the Mayor’s Committee on Youth from 2007 to 2013.
She was re-elected in 2017, defeating petitioning candidate Reverend Peter Aduba.
“Eight years ago I stood before our republican town committee and humbly accepted their nomination,” Mayor Carbone said at her July 9 press conference. “Eight years ago at that town committee meeting, I showed up with a pair of pink sneakers, I promised to hit up every neighborhood and work as hard as I could to gain the confidence of this community to be elected mayor. I am proud to say the shoes still fit and I’m going to do it again. Together all things are possible when we come together, and that’s how we get things done in the city of Torrington. I love my hometown and it is an honor and privilege to serve to make it such a great place to work and live. My focus has always been on restoring the pride and the sense of community that we all crave. I believe that Torrington should be recognized as a humble, yet a progressive city that we all love. I wish to continue that work that I have undertaken in the past few years to draw that positive energy and attention to our hometown.”
Mayor Carbone said that one of her goals for a third term would be to manage local taxes.
“Managing local taxes requires an intense focus on the budget,” Mayor Carbone said. “Over the past eight years my mantra has been to hold our taxes steady, and I have done just that. I always remember whose money we are spending, and they deserve a mayor who will crunch every number and do their best to deliver a budget that is efficient and responsible. The economic development that is taking place right now in Torrington is unprecedented and directly related to me chasing grant opportunities that eluded us in the past. Approaching public, and private partnerships that develop, and making investments that send a strong message that Torrington is worthy of investment. I have always said that if we are not investing in ourselves, how can we expect others to invest in us?”
Democratic competition
Meanwhile, Ivain announced his candidacy at a press conference at City Hall on Monday, July 12.
On his LinkedIn page, he is listed as currently working as an Investment Product Consultant at MassMutual, where he has been working since 2019.
He has served as a volunteer at Chorus Angelicus and is currently the chairman of its Board of Directors.
In 2019 he unsuccessfully ran for a seat on the City Council.
“I believe that I can make a difference in Torrington,” Ivain said in an interview with The Winsted Phoenix. “I think we can set a new path for the next generation and we can make a lot of changes that can be beneficial for all the residents in Torrington. I think it’s a great moment to do it.”
Ivain said that his main goal is to change the business climate in Torrington.
“We have to focus on a business plan and we have to encourage businesses to move here, which will lower taxes,” Ivain said. “We have to reorganize City Hall to accomplish these things.”
Ivain was critical of Mayor Carbone’s tenure in office.
“During her tenure, the mill rate has gone from a little over 36 when she took office to over 46 currently,” he said. “We have to change that. We can change that by changing the business climate in our community. We have to become pro-business oriented and work with businesses to help them expand in the town. I do not think businesses are being courted for Torrington right now. We are not growing at the rate of inflation. We are at a stagnant phase right now. We need to improve on that. We need to grow above the rate of inflation to lower the tax rate. That’s my goal.”

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