Ned Barron putting up the “Weekend in Norfolk” sign on Friday, July 30. “ “Norfolk is a small town that’s got a big heart,” Barron said. “The biggest asset for this town is the community because everyone pitches in to make this town work.
Ned Barron putting up the “Weekend in Norfolk” sign on Friday, July 30. “ “Norfolk is a small town that’s got a big heart,” Barron said. “The biggest asset for this town is the community because everyone pitches in to make this town work."
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NORFOLK —  For many years, both the summer and winter editions of the Weekend in Norfolk event showcased what the small Connecticut town of 1,632 has to offer: live music, art shows, tours of historic buildings, and the many natural resources in town.

Last year due to the pandemic, both editions of the event were held virtually, with videos of performances and other parts of the event posted on the Weekend in Norfolk website.

One year later, this summer’s three-day Weekend in Norfolk was held with in-person activities on Friday, July 30, Saturday, July 31, and Sunday, Aug. 1.

Some parts of the annual event have changed: performances by the Yale Summer School of Music were all live-streamed from the Music Shed to The Norfolk Hub and broadcasted on a video screen, and the annual hot dog eating contest was canceled. 

But much of the typical parts of the event still went forward: walking tours of historic Norfolk, tours of stained glass displays at the local churches, outdoor performances by musicians, open houses at local farms, lawn games, bocce, and various programs sponsored by The Norfolk Library.

“This event is a chance to showcase what Norfolk has to offer and why it’s a great town to live in,” resident Nels White said.

White gave tours of the historic stained glass windows at the Battell Chapel during the three-day event. 

“It’s also a great place to visit because there are so many fun things to do. We want to show the outside world why Norfolk is such a great place to live.”

“It gives a chance for the town to showcase all of its organizations, restaurants, its amazing churches, and all of our natural resources,” event co-organizer Ned Barron said. “Norfolk is a small town that’s got a big heart. This town runs on volunteers and the people who make this town what it is. This event is all operated by volunteers and they are all the ones who make this happen. The biggest asset for this town is the community because everyone pitches in to make this town work.”

All photos by Shaw Israel Izikson

Nels White who gave guided tours of the historic stained glass windows at the Battell Chapel.
Lou Barbagallo, who gave guided tours of the stained glass windows at the Immaculate Conception Church.
Inside the Norfolk Historical Society – with its current exhibition From Solitude to Sisterhood: Norfolk Women and the Vote
Norfolk Historical Society Director Barry Webber about to give a tour of the town’s historic village green.“Norfolk is infinitely interesting,” Webber said. “People like to know about the town’s history. It’s an endless source of information and education.”
A pop-up lemonade stand at Weekend in Norfolk. From left: Travis Boucher, Lindsey Boucher, Halle Boucher, 13, and Luke Boucher, 11, and Coleen Hellerman.
The Grantville Dawgs playing some rocking tunes on Friday, July 30.
The Norfolk Library offered up a program featuring Animal Embassy at the Village Green on Friday, July 30.
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